Casio Privia Digital Pianos Get Star Treatment From Karmin and Caroline Manzo

Keyboards might be the go-to choice for most bands out there, but they’re still no replacement for an authentic grand piano. Until now, that is.

Casio’s newest line of keyboards, the Privia line, is chock full of state-of-the-art keyboards that have been designed to mimic the sound and feel of a grand piano in more ways than one. The finest of the Privia line, the PX-850BK, does the best at pretending it’s a grand piano, with a sound engine that has three times as much memory as previous Casio keyboards, allowing for richer sound production. The AiR (Acoustic and intelligent Resonator) further imitates the sounds and nuance of a grand piano. It even has a Damper and String Resonance and Hammer Response simulator, which actually simulates the vibrations of the strings of a piano and the effects of the sustain pedals.

Of course, being a keyboard, it offers more than a few bonus features that a grand piano can’t offer. The 88-key keyboard can be split into two equal ranges, ideal for training sessions. Besides the grand piano sounds, the PX-850BK can produce sounds from several different musical instruments, or can be played in split or layer modes – one hand can play bass, while the other hand can still play two-layered tones by itself. The USB port allows the keyboard to be connected to a computer, and no extra drivers are required. Thanks to USB MIDI, it can even be used with an iPad along with an Apple Camera Connection Kit.

The PX-850BK really sells the grand piano effect – it even has a top lid that can be opened fully, opened halfway, or closed, to create different authentic resonance effects.

Casio’s newest keyboard was shown off at the Beyond Sound Launch Party last week, where the up-and-coming musical duo Karmin showed off just what the Privia PX-850BK can do. If you want to find out for yourself what the Privia can do, you’d better start saving those pennies – Casio’s prize keyboard is going for $1,500.