UK Hackers Encouraged to Crack Binary Code in New Street Art



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Brand new street art is about to start popping up in England over the next few weeks, but we’re not talking about Banksy. We’re talking about graffiti that comes with a challenge – coded messages that hackers can hack away at to score tickets to Campus Party.

Campus Party is Europe’s premier technology festival, which doubles as a school for cracking codes. The festival will be going down from September 2 to 7 at the O2 Arena in London, and one way to get tickets is to get to cracking those gems of graffiti art.



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Those pieces of art, which will be showing up on the walls of London, Manchester, and Birmingham over the next few weeks, will pay tribute to masters of the code – Alan Turing, the father of computer science who helped crack the Enigma code back in World War II, Nolan Bushnell, the brains behind Atari, Tim Berners-Lee, a critical co-founder of the World Wide Web, and Samuel Morse, whose last name says it all. If you’re going to make a Mount Rushmore of coding legends, you’d be hard pressed to do better than those four.



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Cracking the codes and entering them in the Campus Party website will enter you in to a drawing to win two tickets to the festival. From the looks of it, there’s a binary code, a hexadecimal code, some Morse code, and possibly a number-to-letter substitution cipher. They’re all painted on walls alongside the legends of coding, making for some terrific-looking pop street art.

The art will be up until Campus Party in September, where about 10,000 people will congregate to soak in the latest trends, movements, and big ideas in the world of technology. If you’re so inclined, you can try to get yourself counted among those 10,000 by cracking those codes, which you’ll have to hunt down wherever they pop up in England (or, fortunately, you can spot the codes on the YouTube video). Otherwise, if you’re in England, you can just stop by and enjoy the sights.