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According to Smartphone Report, Apple Still King in the US

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Screen-Shot-2014-06-04-at-9.16.14-AMNumbers are out for smartphone OEM market share in the United States current to March 2014, and, unsurprisingly, Apple is still on top – considering how large its lead is, it figures to stay there for quite some time.

OEM means original equipment manufacturer, so we’re talking hardware here. Apple has 41.4 percent of the U.S. market, down a little from 41.8 percent in the previous quarter. Samsung is by itself at number two, with 27 percent of the market – an increase of nearly one percent from the previous quarter. Then, there’s – well, everyone else. LG, Motorola and HTC are the next three, bunched together at 6.7 percent, 6.4 percent and 5.4 percent.

Software is a different story, with Android retaining its lead and enjoying a 0.7 percent increase to 52.2 percent, with iOS in second at 41.4 percent. The gap between second and third is even more striking than in hardware – we go from 41.4 percent to 3.3 percent, where Windows Phone has finally overtaken BlackBerry. BlackBerry shed another 0.7 percent in market share over the last quarter, ending up at 2.7 percent. Symbian is still hanging around at 0.2 percent, because you know what, Symbian phones don’t break very easily. Those old Nokia bricks are like the cockroaches of the cell phone world. I’m pretty sure they would survive nuclear blasts.

Despite Android leading in software, Apple’s continued dominance in the U.S. is striking. The fact that two in five smartphones in the United States are iPhones is a pretty impressive achievement. Still, with a slight decrease over the past quarter and with Samsung continuing to surge, it’s fair to wonder, in the long run, how much longer Apple can stay on top. Then again, that’s probably why we have WWDCs of the nature we saw this past week – where Apple’s keenest focus was, more than anything, to make it harder for those who have bought in to the Apple way to ever leave. The walls around that garden are getting higher.

Via Forbes