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When Your Child Is Sick, Sweet Treats Might Be The Last Thing On Your Mind, But This Pediatric Emergency Doctor Is Underscoring The Importance Of Sugar When Kids Are Ill

LIGHTFIELD STUDIOS - stock.adobe.com - illustrative purposes only, not the actual people

Coming down with a cold or catching a stomach bug is a normal part of life. Illnesses are inevitable, and your little one is bound to get sick at least a few times throughout the course of a year. Although frequent illness may be normal, it can take a toll on both parents and children in more ways than one.

For kids, not only are they feeling physically unwell from the sickness, but it is also a great source of mental distress, especially if they’re too young to understand what’s happening to them.

As a parent, if you could just snap your fingers and magically cure your child’s discomfort, you would do so in a heartbeat. Unfortunately, the only thing you can do is administer the right medicine and wait for the cold or flu to pass.

When your kid is sick, the anxiety you feel can make your mind fixate on worst-case scenarios. But the best thing you can do for your child during times of uncertainty is focus on what you can control. And one of those things is their sugar intake.

Usually, parents are always concerned about if their children are eating or drinking too much sugar. However, it’s just as crucial to make sure your youngster is getting enough sugar.

Meghan Martin (@beachgem10) is a pediatric emergency medical doctor, and she’s on TikTok talking about how sick kids need a source of sugar/glucose to power their bodies, especially if they’re not eating much.

In her video, she emphasizes that they need a beverage with sugar in it to prevent their blood sugar levels from dropping to dangerously low levels.

“If we’re fasting and not eating, we have these glycogen stores in our liver that we can use to rapidly get glucose and keep our blood sugar fairly steady,” said Meghan, referring to adults. But for kids, it’s a different story.

“However, young kids, toddlers, and infants really don’t have this, or their stores are very small, which is actually why it’s important that newborn babies are fed every couple of hours because they cannot maintain their blood sugar if they’re not.”

LIGHTFIELD STUDIOS – stock.adobe.com – illustrative purposes only, not the actual people

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