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She Got Vulnerable And Shared Just How Depressed Working From Home Has Made Her, Sparking Conversation Online About Strategies To Preserve Mental Health As A Remote Worker

Moha - stock.adobe.com - illustrative purposes only, not the actual person

Since the COVID-19 pandemic, many of us have been working from home.

Before all of the lockdowns and quarantine procedures, working from home used to be a special kind of privilege or something employees got to experience every once in a while. What used to be a fairly abnormal way of working became one of the most popular work environments in the job world today.

Now, in 2023, it’s much more common to meet people who work remotely full-time or are only in the office two to three days a week.

While working from home does have many obvious perks, like not having to worry about commutes, being able to lounge in whatever cozy spot at home you like the best, and having everything you need for the day at home.

However, it can be easy to get stuck in a rut when working from home, and there are parts of a traditional in-person work environment you miss out on, like social interactions with co-workers and solid daily routines.

British TikTok creator Grace (@graceaamelia) recently made a vulnerable video about how she’s been feeling depressed due to her mundane work-from-home routine, and it’s striking a nerve with a crowd she refers to as “depressed work-from-home girlies.”

“I can’t be the only one going through this work-from-home depression right now,” says Grace at the start of her TikTok.

“Especially since it’s going to rain for the next five months, I might literally not leave the house.”

Grace explains how she goes straight from her bed to her laptop most mornings. On a good day, she might go to the gym after she logs out of work, but overall, she has an average workout. Then she’ll go home and scroll on social media while sitting in front of the television before going to bed to repeat everything the next day.

Moha – stock.adobe.com – illustrative purposes only, not the actual person

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