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She Uninvited Her Nieces And Nephews From Her Monthly Family Dinners Because Her In-Laws Keep Dropping Their Sick Kids At Her House And Leaving To Have Date Nights

fizkes - stock.adobe.com - illustrative purposes only, not the actual person

Can you imagine inviting your relatives over for a family dinner, only to have them drop their kids off at your house and dip so they can have fun?

That happened several times to one woman who recently had to call out her in-laws for leaving their sick kids at her house during what was supposed to be a family dinner with everybody. 

Once a month, she and her husband like to have his family over for dinner. The gang includes her mother and father-in-law, his siblings and their partners, as well as their nieces and nephews. She and her husband have a few children as well, so it’s a decent amount of people.

Unfortunately, whenever her brother and sister-in-law show up to the family dinners, they drop their kids off or have them show up with their grandparents while they stay at home or have a “date night.”

“[They’ve] been using me as their own personal babysitter without asking,” she explained.

“The rest of his family neglects to watch the kids, so I’m stuck watching not only my own children, who are all below the age of five but also my husband’s nieces and nephews, who are all also below the age of five. Altogether, there are six children below the age of five under my care alone because absolutely no one else will take the time to watch them.”

During their most recent dinner, her brother and sister-in-law did something especially rude, and it was the last straw.

The day of the dinner, they got word that there was an illness going around in the family’s kids. Before dinnertime, her husband texted his siblings and asked them not to bring their sick kids to their dinner to avoid getting everyone else sick.

But sure enough, when dinnertime rolled around, her sick nieces and nephews walked through their door with her in-laws. 

fizkes – stock.adobe.com – illustrative purposes only, not the actual person

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