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Help Your Feathered Friends Find Food This Winter By Following These Tips For Feeding Birds In Chilly Weather

ondrejprosicky - stock.adobe.com - illustrative purposes only, not the actual bird

Some of the most common winter birds you might see poking around your outdoor space include bluejays, robins, and northern cardinals. The winter months can be a tough time for birds to get through. The cold weather requires them to eat more to stay warm, but the snow makes it a challenge for them to find the food they need.

Fortunately, you can do something to help out your feathered friends. This winter, help the birds in your backyard thrive and survive by providing a source of food for them. Follow these tips on how best to feed birds during the cold season.

Set Out Suet And Other High Energy Foods

In winter, birds need to be able to get quick boosts of energy and staying power to last through long, cold nights. Foods with high-fat content will be easy for them to eat, satisfy their appetites, and give them fuel.

Offer suet, unsalted peanut butter, sunflower seeds, and nuts. You can spread the peanut butter on a large pinecone and hang it from a tree branch. These foods will attract woodpeckers, chickadees, wrens, goldfinches, cardinals, blue jays, robins, and more.

Feed Birds Fruit

Birds are always a fan of fruit. In addition to seeds and suet, set out apples, pears, cherries, oranges, and grapes so they can have plenty of variety and nutrition. Cut up the fruit into smaller chunks to make it easier for the birds to eat.

Offer Items From Your Kitchen

Some common household scraps can be enjoyed by birds. For example, cheese is popular with a wide range of birds. It has a lot of calories, which means that the winged creatures will receive more energy from it. Feed them a grated mild cheddar. Cooked pasta and rice leftover from your dinner works as well, particularly for the woodpeckers, blue jays, and titmice.

ondrejprosicky – stock.adobe.com – illustrative purposes only, not the actual bird

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