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New Research Suggests That People With A Higher Income Have A 32% Lower Risk Of Dying After A Stroke, And Those With Higher Education Levels Have A 26% Lower Mortality Risk Post-Stroke

elnariz - stock.adobe.com - illustrative purposes only, not the actual person

According to the CDC, more than 795,000 people in the United States suffer a stroke each year, and not all patients have the same odds of survival.

But, a recent study revealed two factors that may have a significant impact. The research suggests that your income and educational level may greatly influence your chances of stroke survival.

Professor Katharina Stibrant Sunnerhagen from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden led this study and examined the medical records of just under 7,000 stroke patients from 2014 to 2019 in Gothenburg.

The results show that individuals with higher incomes had a striking 32% lower risk of dying following a stroke as opposed to those with lower incomes. Additionally, individuals with higher education levels experienced a 26% lower mortality risk after a stroke.

The research team has since defined these elements as “social determinants of health,” or SDoH. Essentially, they refer to the circumstances people are born into, grow up in, live, work, and age – all of which can significantly influence health outcomes.

So, this particular study honed in on four primary SDoH factors, including residential area, country of origin, level of education, and income.

The findings revealed just how these societal factors can unfavorably affect certain people. Patients with only one adverse SDoH factor actually had an 18% higher risk of mortality after a stroke in comparison to those without any factors.

Plus, for people burdened with two to four adverse SDoH factors, their risk of mortality after a stroke surged to 24%.

“Our findings underscore a stark reality – an individual’s socioeconomic status can be a matter of life or death in the context of stroke, especially when they are confronted with multiple unfavorable SDoH factors,” Stibrant Sunnerhagen explained.

elnariz – stock.adobe.com – illustrative purposes only, not the actual person

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