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The 200-Year-Old Mystery Of The Teen Boy Found Wandering Around A German Town, Claiming To Have Spent His Entire Life In A Prison Cell

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One morning in 1828, a young boy appeared seemingly out of thin air. He was found wandering a public square in what is now Nuremberg, Germany.

The boy was 16-years-old and was dressed in tattered clothing. He wore a gray jacket, waistcoat, pantaloons, a silk necktie, and torn-up boots. He had a handkerchief embroidered with the letters “KH” and carried an envelope.

In the envelope were two letters. One of them was addressed to Captain von Wessenig, the captain of the fourth squadron of the sixth cavalry regiment, asking him to take the boy into his charge. It was written by an anonymous laborer who had raised the boy.

The other letter was penned by the boy’s mother, and it stated that she could no longer take care of him. The boy’s father also wasn’t alive, so he would be sent to join the military. The boy had grown up in isolation so that no one would know his whereabouts. To this day, it is unclear who exactly he was or where he had come from.

When he was taken to the captain’s house to be questioned, the boy seemed confused. He only knew how to read and write his own name, Kaspar Hauser. He also kept saying that he wanted to be a cavalryman just like his father and repeated the word “horse.”

Aside from that, his speech was limited. He indulged in bread and water but would turn his nose up at meats and vegetables. Overall, he didn’t have much in the ways of civilized manners.

Eventually, he was put under the care of a British nobleman named Lord Stanhope. Within several weeks, he learned how to read, write, and communicate effectively, much to the surprise of everyone.

Once his vocabulary expanded, Hauser began to tell a story about being raised in a prison. He described being in a cell that was about six feet long, three feet wide, and three and a half feet high.

He slept on a straw bed and was left bread and water to consume. However, the water was always bitter and made him sleep for a long time.

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