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While There Still Is No Cure For Cancer, Aspirin Can Actually Help To Fight It

The team of researchers also investigated how aspirin affects colorectal cancer cells and immune cells in a laboratory setting.

After exposing aspirin to these cells, they found that the immune cells demonstrated elevated levels of activation. Additionally, their ability to alert each other of the growing tumor was improved.

It is still unclear exactly how much aspirin is needed to produce these effects, so further research is necessary to gain more knowledge about how the process works.

Still, these findings are important because they provide another potential treatment option for colorectal cancer and possibly other types of cancer in the future.

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