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A White Christmas Might Not Be In The Cards This Year Due To Global Warming And A 95% Probability Of This Winter Setting New Global Temperature Records, According To New Research

EMrpize - stock.adobe.com - illustrative purposes only

A white Christmas might be off the table this holiday season due to global warming. With the intense heat waves that swept across the world during the summer and fall of 2023, there’s growing worry about a remarkably warm winter on the horizon.

In fact, experts are now cautioning that this winter could bring temperatures higher than ever before recorded.

Between June and October of this year, the globe experienced temperatures substantially higher than the averages from 1991 to 2020.

Specifically, August and September saw temperatures surpass historical norms by 0.62 degrees and 0.69 degrees Celcius, respectively, setting new records that outstripped those of 2016.

This concerning pattern, driven by global warming and the return of the El Niño event after a seven-year hiatus, has sparked worry and drawn international focus.

To evaluate the possible effects of these recent climatic changes, the Short-Term Climate Prediction Team from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, part of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, conducted in-depth research.

Their most recent results indicate the likely emergence of an Eastern Pacific El Niño, ranging from moderate to strong in intensity. This is anticipated to lead to atypical weather patterns in regions like East Asia and North America.

The study underscores the joint impact of the El Niño phenomenon and the continuous trend of global warming, raising alarm for the winter of 2023 and 2024.

Most notably, it suggests a 95% probability of this winter setting new global temperature records, with areas in the mid to low latitudes of Eurasia and much of the Americas preparing for an unusually warm season.

EMrpize – stock.adobe.com – illustrative purposes only

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