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New Research Suggests That While Drinking Coffee May Aid Weight Loss, Adding Even Just One Teaspoon Of Sugar Could Cancel Out This Benefit

Photo 65239722 © Pojoslaw - Dreamstime.com - illustrative purposes only, not the actual person

It’s no secret that Americans really cherish their coffee. According to health experts, sipping on the caffeinated beverage isn’t just a treat for your taste buds, either. It’s actually good for you, too.

Enjoying coffee in moderation has been associated with lower risks of certain health conditions, such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.

And according to a recent study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, there may even be another perk. The research suggests that coffee could potentially aid weight loss.

But, there is a small caveat– the popular beverage must be consumed without any sweeteners.

The researchers pointed out that most people enjoy their coffee with added sugar, cream or non-dairy creamers, and artificial sweeteners.

However, they set out to study the connections between the amount of coffee consumed, the intake of caffeine, and variations in body weight, especially in relation to what people mix into their coffee. Additionally, the team was curious to see if coffee or caffeine could counteract any weight changes caused by the added sugars.

This extensive study involved a large sample size, including 48,891 individuals from the Nurses’ Health Study and 83,464 from the Nurses’ Health Study II. Additionally, another 22,863 people from the Health Professional Follow-Up Study also participated.

Each participant was required to complete surveys about their food and drink habits over the past year and then again for the following four years. The survey also collected data regarding coffee consumption– covering both regular and decaffeinated varieties– and what the participants typically added to their coffee.

The researchers meticulously examined this data to uncover any links between the amount of coffee consumed and changes in the participants’ weight during the study period.

Photo 65239722 © Pojoslaw – Dreamstime.com – illustrative purposes only, not the actual person

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