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New Research Suggests That High Fish Intake During Toddlerhood Is Linked With A 25% Lower Risk Of Developing Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) And A 54% Lower Risk Of Ulcerative Colitis

karepa - stock.adobe.com - illustrative purposes only

Eating a nutritious diet during toddlerhood can reduce the risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by 25%, according to a new study conducted by researchers in Sweden. They believe that what children eat at around 1 year old could be key in avoiding conditions like IBD.

With a worldwide increase in IBD cases, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, doctors are thinking about suggesting specific diets for babies as a preventive measure.

This comes as changes in eating habits are suspected to play a role in these illnesses by affecting the gut microbiome.

Prior studies mainly examined the link between diet and the risk of IBD in adults, often overlooking the dietary impact during early childhood.

However, this Scandinavian research team utilized data from two significant studies: the All Babies in Southeast Sweden study (ABIS) and The Norwegian Mother, Father, and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

ABIS covered 21,700 children born between October 1997 and October 1999. In contrast, MoBa involved 114,500 children and their parents– a total of 95,200 moms and 75,200 dads– gathered from various locations in Norway from 1999 to 2008.

Parents reported their children’s eating habits when they were between 12 and 18 months old and 30 to 36 months old.

To assess the quality of their diet, a scoring system was used, which considered the intake of various foods such as meat, fish, fruits, and dairy products, as well as the consumption of sweets, snacks, and beverages.

“Higher diet quality– a higher intake of vegetables, fruit, and fish, and a lower intake of meat, sweets, snacks, and drinks– was reflected in a higher score,” detailed Dr. Annie Guo of the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

karepa – stock.adobe.com – illustrative purposes only

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