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Numerous Submerged Treasures, Including Temples Dedicated To The Greek Goddess Aphrodite, Were Discovered In An Ancient Underwater City Four Miles Off The Coast Of Egypt

AlexAnton - stock.adobe.com - illustrative purposes only

Just four miles off the coast of Egypt, a trove of treasures was discovered in an ancient port city called Thonis-Heracleion.

The underwater city was located at the bottom of the Bay of Aboukir in the Mediterranean Sea.

Among the finds were temples dedicated to Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love and beauty, and Amun, the most important deity in ancient Egypt.

The city was first found in 2000 by the European Institute for Underwater Archaeology (IEASM). A more recent exploration of the site was conducted last fall in partnership with the Department of Underwater Archaeology at the Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities of Egypt.

A team of researchers discovered that sometime during the 2nd century B.C.E., in the south canal of the ancient city, a natural disaster had caused the stone blocks from the shrine of Amun to collapse partially.

It had been a site of major significance, as it served as the place for Egyptian pharaohs to receive divine blessings of their kingship from the highest, most supreme god of the ancient Egyptian pantheon.

Amun had often been depicted with a ram’s head or wearing a crown affixed with two tall plumes. He was the god of fertility, creation, air, and invisibility. His name translates to “the hidden one.”

Excavations have revealed a number of precious artifacts, including beautiful gold jewelry, silver ritual instruments, and delicately crafted alabaster jars for holding perfumes and ointments. Additionally, well-preserved structures beneath the temple were uncovered.

The structures were composed of wooden beams and poles that dated back to the 5th century B.C.E. To detect objects buried under layers of clay, the researchers utilized geophysical prospecting technologies.

AlexAnton – stock.adobe.com – illustrative purposes only

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