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His Wife Has Been Blowing All Their Money On Doomsday Prepping After Watching A Netflix Movie, And He Thinks She’s Being Way Too Excessive

Drobot Dean - stock.adobe.com - illustrative purposes only, not the actual person

This 30-year-old man and his wife got married last year, and their marriage has gone smoothly for the most part. However, they’ve been struggling financially, especially because they just got married and are figuring out how to make financial decisions as a team. Neither earns a high salary, and they live paycheck to paycheck.

They kept their bank accounts separate and agreed they could do what they wanted with their money. While discussing finances, they decided to save as much money as possible to purchase a house one day.

“We just watched ‘Leave the World Behind’ on Netflix a couple of weeks ago, which we both enjoyed. But ever since then, my wife has been on this kick about doomsday prepping, worried that something catastrophic could happen at any moment,” he said.

Initially, he assumed his wife was only speaking hypothetically for fun, so they talked about plans for tough situations in the future. He didn’t think his wife was serious. However, she bought hundreds of dollars worth of doomsday prep-related items on Amazon.

She purchased potassium iodide tablets, life straws, and bug-out bag survival kits. He clarified that he adores his wife and thought some of her purchases, like a hand crank radio, were a good idea.

“But in my opinion, this is getting excessive. A few nights ago, she brought it up again. Instead of telling me what she’s buying now, she said, ‘What are you going to get? It’s not fair that all this is coming out of my bank account when we’re both going to use it. That’s where I had to stop her,” he explained.

While he and his wife didn’t have a big fight over it, they bickered back and forth a bit. He attempted to explain that he wasn’t interested in purchasing doomsday prep items because there was no guarantee that a catastrophic event would even happen.

He acknowledged that it was smart to plan ahead, but it was a detriment to them if they spent all of their money doomsday prepping.

In response, his wife reminded him of the movie they’d recently watched, and he argued that there were hundreds of fictional doomsday films in existence, and these films were meant to scare audiences. His wife didn’t understand his perspective and acted like he was being immature. She assumed he thought the world was perfect and nothing bad would ever happen.

Drobot Dean – stock.adobe.com – illustrative purposes only, not the actual person

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