Microsoft Bluetooth Mobile Keyboard 6000 Review



thinkkeyboard 11 300x164 Microsoft Bluetooth Mobile Keyboard 6000 Review



The new Microsoft Bluetooth Mobile Keyboard 6000 is the ultimate keyboard for the mobile professional and anyone else who is constantly on the go. Unlike most mobile keyboards which compromise in some area, the Bluetooth Mobile Keyboard hasn’t made much sacrifices.The keyboard is also a great solution for netbook users who want a portable solution to compliment their very cramped netbook keyboard.

Set-up:
The keyboard is compatible with Windows 7 and Mac right out of the box. The included manual even shows you how to set the device up with both a Mac and a PC. There is no software included and we were able to connect to an iMac instantly without issues.

Design:
The first thing that you notice about the Bluetooth Mobile Keyboard 6000 when you look at it is how thin it is. It measures just under a half an inch thick, it’s 13.9″ wide and 6.54″ high. You can easily throw it in to a bag, and this is the first keyboard we have ever been able to say that about without it being tiny. As a matter of fact, because it is so thin and lightweight you really won’t mind carrying it back and forth to the office every day. We’ve already had many Ooohs and Ahhs reactions from co-workers when they took a look at the 6000. Lets just say that it’s not everyday that people notice a keyboard at all, let alone make oohing sounds.

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Wireless range:
The Bluetooth Mobile Keyboard 6000 operates on Bluetooth. This is ideal since that means it’s a totally wireless solution, and you don’t need a USB receiver. MacBook Air users or anyone with limited USB ports will of course appreciate that.
We were able to operate the keyboard from nearly 40 feet away from a connected computer. That means that the Bluetooth Mobile Keyboard 6000 can also work as a great Media Center PC keyboard as well as the perfect keyboard for presentations.

Number Pad:
The keyboard comes with a separate number pad. This is an ideal situation for those who will be traveling with the keyboard, but if the number pad were to be on the keyboard that would add significant width to the keyboard thus making it a lot less portable. By including a separate number pad, you’re basically getting the best of both worlds. A carrying case is even included for you to tote the number pad in, which is a nice touch. However, we wish that there had been a case included for the keyboard itself too since this is a keyboard that you are likely to be traveling a lot with. We rarely use the number pad nowadays, but we know plenty of Excel users and gamers whom still value having a number pad. The number pad will also be available to purchase separately.

Ergonomics:
The keyboard is very comfortable to type on and has great tactile feedback. It feels much like a traditional notebook’s keyboard with low profile keys. Of course, keyboard comfort levels can vary differently from person to person, but we think that it’s safe to say that most people will enjoy using this keyboard. The  Bluetooth Mobile Keyboard 6000 also features a comfort curve design that “encourages natural wrist posture”. Afters years of working all day long at the computer, we’re very sensitive to keyboards and mice with ergonomics, so the fact that they were able to throw in some ergonomics in to a mobile keyboard is appreciated.
The only area where the keyboard’s ergonomics fall short is that it doesn’t have any legs to give the keyboard a tilt. This means that you end up typing with your hands lying very flat and that just isn’t ideal. The keyboard is slightly raised higher in the front because of its battery cover, but it’s not enough to make a significant difference. We’re sure that they left out a stand in order to keep the keyboard as thin as possible, but we would have been willing to sacrifice some of the thinness in order to have a stronger tilting angle.

Battery:
The keyboard runs on 3 AAA batteries, which are included. The alphanumeric keyboard runs on 2 batteries, while the number pad runs on 1. There is also a battery status indicator located on the top right of the keyboard. The battery life is supposed to last up to 10 months on a set of batteries, and the on/off switch lets you conserve battery power.

Conclusion:
We’re thrilled with the Microsoft Bluetooth Mobile Keyboard 6000. It looks great, manages to fit in our bag without being a headache, and it is super comfortable to type on. If you’ve been looking for the ideal keyboard to complement your laptop or netbook, look no further. The Microsoft Bluetooth Mobile Keyboard 6000 retails for $89.99 and comes with a 3-Year Limited Warranty. The keyboard goes on sale in October.

The Good:
Ultra thin and lightweight for easy traveling, good tactile feedback, great for presentations, separate number pad is included.

The Bad:
No keyboard legs, carrying case only included for the number pad.

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  • David

    How’d you get one of these? Any ideas on when I will be able to buy one?

    Thanks

  • David

    How’d you get one of these? Any ideas on when I will be able to buy one?

    Thanks

  • David

    How’d you get one of these? Any ideas on when I will be able to buy one?

    Thanks

  • http://www.hippieboydesign.com HippieBoy

    I just bought this keyboard from Staples a few hours ago. So far I really like it… With a caveat. I’m a Mac user. I guess I didn’t realize that I’d have to relearn ALL my key commands… I’m hoping to find a workaround, or some way to tell my Mac that the “windows” button is really the “option” button, and the “Alt” key is really “Command.”

  • http://www.hippieboydesign.com HippieBoy

    I just bought this keyboard from Staples a few hours ago. So far I really like it… With a caveat. I’m a Mac user. I guess I didn’t realize that I’d have to relearn ALL my key commands… I’m hoping to find a workaround, or some way to tell my Mac that the “windows” button is really the “option” button, and the “Alt” key is really “Command.”

  • http://www.hippieboydesign.com HippieBoy

    I just bought this keyboard from Staples a few hours ago. So far I really like it… With a caveat. I’m a Mac user. I guess I didn’t realize that I’d have to relearn ALL my key commands… I’m hoping to find a workaround, or some way to tell my Mac that the “windows” button is really the “option” button, and the “Alt” key is really “Command.”

  • Kim

    To Hippie Boy… to change the key function, go to system preferences, Keyboard and Mouse, and select Modifier keys. You can change the function of the keys to your preference.
    Also, the fact that they didn’t put a tilt on the keyboard is a good thing. Too many key with their wrists bent up too much. Putting the legs up on the keyboard increases the problem and I always make the recommendation to keep them down.
    Looks like a great keyboard from an ergonomics perspective. Anything to take the reach away while using the mouse is a good thing. The slight split will also be helpful. Will give it a try.

  • Kim

    To Hippie Boy… to change the key function, go to system preferences, Keyboard and Mouse, and select Modifier keys. You can change the function of the keys to your preference.
    Also, the fact that they didn’t put a tilt on the keyboard is a good thing. Too many key with their wrists bent up too much. Putting the legs up on the keyboard increases the problem and I always make the recommendation to keep them down.
    Looks like a great keyboard from an ergonomics perspective. Anything to take the reach away while using the mouse is a good thing. The slight split will also be helpful. Will give it a try.

  • Kim

    To Hippie Boy… to change the key function, go to system preferences, Keyboard and Mouse, and select Modifier keys. You can change the function of the keys to your preference.
    Also, the fact that they didn’t put a tilt on the keyboard is a good thing. Too many key with their wrists bent up too much. Putting the legs up on the keyboard increases the problem and I always make the recommendation to keep them down.
    Looks like a great keyboard from an ergonomics perspective. Anything to take the reach away while using the mouse is a good thing. The slight split will also be helpful. Will give it a try.

  • http://mikelward.com Mikel

    The lack of keyboard legs is probably a good thing. Microsoft’s other ergonomic keyboard, the Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000, slopes downwards (a “7-degree reverse slope” as they call it), supposedly for ergonomic reasons, so raising the back of the keyboard is the last thing you should do if Microsoft’s ergonomists are right.

  • http://mikelward.com Mikel

    The lack of keyboard legs is probably a good thing. Microsoft’s other ergonomic keyboard, the Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000, slopes downwards (a “7-degree reverse slope” as they call it), supposedly for ergonomic reasons, so raising the back of the keyboard is the last thing you should do if Microsoft’s ergonomists are right.

  • http://mikelward.com Mikel

    The lack of keyboard legs is probably a good thing. Microsoft’s other ergonomic keyboard, the Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000, slopes downwards (a “7-degree reverse slope” as they call it), supposedly for ergonomic reasons, so raising the back of the keyboard is the last thing you should do if Microsoft’s ergonomists are right.